Faking Positive Emotions at Work Linked with Heavier Drinking

A form of workplace stress frequently goes unnoticed: faking happiness on the job.  This workplace stressor has now been linked with a potentially problematic outcome:  increased drinking.  The results of a new study have demonstrated that employees who force themselves to smile and be happy in front of customers — or who try to hide feelings of annoyance — may be at risk for heavier drinking after work.

.

Study overview

A team of researchers at Penn State and the University at Buffalo studied the drinking habits of people who routinely work with the public, for example people in food service who work with customers, nurses who work with patients or teachers who work with students.

They found a link between those who regularly faked or amplified positive emotions, like smiling, or suppressed negative emotions — resisting the urge to roll one’s eyes, for example — and heavier drinking after work.

More specifically…

“Faking and suppressing emotions with customers was related to drinking beyond the stress of the job or feeling negatively.  It wasn’t just feeling badly that makes them reach for a drink. Instead, the more they have to control negative emotions at work, the less they are able to control their alcohol intake after work…

…by faking or suppressing emotions in front of customers, employees may be using a lot of self-control. Later, those employees may not have a lot of self-control left to regulate how much alcohol they drink.”

-Dr. Alicia Grandey, Professor of psychology, Penn State

Method

For the study, the researchers used data from phone interviews with 1,592 U.S. workers. The data came from a larger survey funded by the National Institutes of Health, called the National Survey of Work Stress and Health, which included almost 3,000 participants who were representative of the U.S. working population.

Data included information about how often the participants faked or suppressed emotions, also called “surface acting,” as well as how often and how much the participants drank after work. The researchers also measured how impulsive the participants are and how much autonomy they feel they have at work.

Results

The researchers found that overall, employees who interacted with the public drank more after work than those who did not. Additionally, surface acting was also linked with drinking after work, and that connection was stronger or weaker depending on the person’s trait-like self-control and the job’s extent of self-control.

The researchers found:

-The relationship between surface acting and drinking after work was stronger for people who are impulsive or who lack personal control over behavior at work.

-A stronger association between surface acting and drinking when employees who are highly impulsive also worked in jobs where employees have one-time service encounters with customers, like a call center or coffee shop, rather than relationships, like health care or education.  (People in these jobs tend to be younger and in entry-level positions, and may lack the self-control tendencies and the financial and social rewards that can buffer the costs of surface acting.)

-Surface acting is less likely to create problems when the work is personally rewarding to the employee. (Nurses, for example, may amplify or fake their emotions for clear reasons like trying to comfort a patient or build a strong relationship. But someone who is faking emotions for a customer they may never see again, that may not be as rewarding, and may ultimately be more draining or demanding.)


 

Journal Reference: Alicia A. Grandey, Michael R. Frone, Robert C. Melloy, Gordon M. Sayre. When are fakers also drinkers? A self-control view of emotional labor and alcohol consumption among U.S. service workers.. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2019; DOI: 10.1037/ocp0000147

Overview


 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close